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What are your observations of each officers performance?

Choose three case studies from the following chapters; Chapter Seven (pp. 190-191), Chapter Eight (pp. 210-211), Chapter Nine (pp. 238-240), and Chapter Ten (pp. 266-267). No two case studies can come from the same chapter. Answer the “Questions for Discussion” of the case studies you have chosen. The answers to your discussion questions will help you write your Case Study Analysis.

Chapter 7
CASE STUDIES
Following are two case studies that enable the reader to consider some of the substantive issues involved with appraising officer performance and to consider some possible solutions.
Case Study #1 Knowing Your People, or Searching for Hidden Meanings
You are a supervisor in Bay City, recently transferred from the robbery/homicide section of detectives to day shift patrol. You begin your new assignment by reviewing crime reports and calls for service data for the area and meeting with each of your officers to discuss their view of the area’s problems and their work productivity. The south area of the district is divided geographically into five beats, consisting of single-family homes, small commercial businesses, and several large apartment complexes. Approximately 50,000 citizens live in the area; most are middle-class white and Hispanic people who reside and work in the area. Crime analysis data reveals that the most prevalent crime problems are daytime burglaries and thefts of property from the apartment complexes, juvenile drinking, and vandalism. The vandalism is not gang related and is mostly spray paint tagging of schools and businesses. There are three main thoroughfares through the area, but traffic accidents are low in comparison with the rest of the city. After reviewing three of your officers’ past performance evaluations, you determine that Officer Stengel leads the patrol division in felony arrests. Her follow-up investigations have led to the identification of two groups of daytime burglars who were truants from the local school. A review of other performance areas shows similar good effort. Officer Robbins has just completed his probationary period. Troubled by the vandalism, he began working with the city attorney and local business owners on an ordinance that would ban the sale of spray paint to juveniles. Robbins makes every effort to work on this project between calls for service, but some of his fellow officers have complained about having to handle some of his calls. Officer Franklin has 10 years’ experience and would like to work a motorcycle traffic assignment. Selections will be made in six months. In an effort to demonstrate his interest in that assignment, Franklin currently leads the department in the number of citations written. He also leads the department in citizen complaints of rude behavior, but only 2 of 10 complaints in the past three months were sustained. Assume that you are about to engage in an annual performance appraisal for each officer.
Questions for Discussion
1.
What are your observations of each officer’s performance?
2.
Do you have any concerns about any of the behaviors demonstrated by any of the officers?
3.
Do the officers satisfactorily address the district’s problems?
4.
Are there any other issues that may require your attention? If so, how would you handle those issues?
5.
Which performance appraisal system (among those described in this chapter) would you opt to use?
Case Study #2 Seeing the World (and Subordinates) Through Rose-Colored Glasses
Sgt. Wilcox is a 10-year veteran, having worked mostly in the fraud section of detectives. She is recently assigned to day shift patrol division and assumes responsibilities for a team of mostly experienced and capable officers. Wilcox believes in a participative management style and therefore thinks that her officers should be involved in setting their work goals and objectives and should participate in the performance evaluation process. Wilcox meets with her team and outlines her approach to performance evaluations. Believing that this should be a positive experience for all, she instructs her officers to keep an individual log of their more notable achievements during the performance period. At the end of the rating period, Wilcox uses their top five accomplishments as a basis for their annual evaluation. When the first rating period is completed, Wilcox is pleased to find that her officers received some of the highest performance ratings in the department. However, she recently learns from her lieutenant that other supervisors are voicing criticisms of her evaluation methods. She is now confused about her evaluation method.
Questions for Discussion
1.
What, if any, do you perceive to be the good aspects of Wilcox’s personal method of evaluation?
2.
What problems might arise from Sgt. Wilcox’s rating system?
3.
What rater errors are being committed, if any? What might be the basis for the peer supervisors’ criticisms?
(Peak 190-191)
The citation provided is a guideline. Please check each citation for accuracy before use.
Chapter 8
CASE STUDIES
The following two case studies provide the reader with some insights concerning how quickly stress can be generated and its effect on police officers; also included are some of the difficult decisions that supervisors, managers, and administrators have to make regarding stressful situations involving their subordinates.
Case Study #1 Near Shootout at K-9 Corral
The headlines read “Near Shootout at K-9 Corral.” The department is stunned by the events of Sunday evening. During a weekly training session, K-9 Officer Tom Watson pointed his duty weapon at Officer Jack Connolly and threatened to shoot him during an argument. Fortunately, no one was injured, but Watson is under investigation for assault. Officer Watson’s friends are not surprised. Since joining the K-9 Unit three months ago, he has been the subject of intense teasing, especially by Connolly, who liked to imitate Watson’s stuttered speech. Watson is very sensitive about his speech and attended three years of therapy at the local university before gaining enough confidence to take the police officer test. Lately, Connolly’s teasing has become more personal—he has imitated Watson’s stutter over the police radio. When other officers and dispatchers began to join in, Watson asked Sgt. Aldous to speak with Connolly. Aldous explained that all new guys got teased and warned him not to make the situation worse by complaining. For the next two weeks, Watson called in sick on the six days that he and Connolly would have worked together. Just prior to the incident, Watson’s fiancé had broken up with him (telling Watson she had a new love interest), he had learned that he owed a significant amount of money in back taxes to the government, and he was bitten on the hand by another K-9 handler’s dog during practice exercises. When Connolly initiated his teasing on the day in question, Watson burst into a rage of vulgarities and threats, drew his service revolver, and pointed it at Connolly; other officers tackled and disarmed Watson.
Questions for Discussion
1.
What were some of the issues and precipitating factors leading to this incident?
2.
Were there any warning signs? If so, what were they?
3.
Could this incident have been avoided? If so, how?
4.
What were Sgt. Aldous’s responsibilities in this matter? Did he meet those responsibilities?
Case Study #2 An Agency at the End of Its ROP
Hill City is a relatively small community of about 80,000 people, whose police department has developed an aggressive Repeat Offender Program (ROP). Its eight hand-picked and specially trained officers engage in forced entries into apartments and houses, serving search warrants on the “worst of the worst” wanted felons. Their work is dangerous and physical, thus all of ROP’s officers are in top physical condition. The supervisor overseeing the ROP team, Sgt. Lyle, was a drill instructor in the military prior to joining the force. He has developed an impressive training regimen for the ROP officers. They usually work out on their own time at least once a week, have high esprit de corps, and pride themselves on never losing a suspect or a physical confrontation. They often go out partying together to “blow off steam.” They generally consider themselves to be elite and “head and shoulders above the rest.” One day, while the team was attempting to serve a robbery warrant at a local motel, the suspect escaped through a rear window and led three ROP officers on a foot pursuit. After running extremely hard for about six blocks, the officers became exhausted and were unable to maintain their chase.
The following week, the same suspect robbed a fast-food establishment, and during his escape he killed a clerk and seriously wounded a police officer. Irate because the ROP team failed to catch the suspect earlier, many Hill City patrol officers begin to criticize the ROP team—whose members they consider to be overly exalted prima donnas—with one officer stating to a newspaper reporter that the entire team should be disciplined and that ROP should be disbanded. In one instance, a fight nearly ensued between two officers. The situation has now reached a boiling point, causing nearly all officers to take one side or another, fomenting a lot of stress and turmoil within the small agency, and causing officer requests for sick leave and vacation time to spike as never before. Sensing the urgency of the situation, and that his agency is being torn apart both from within and without, the chief asks all administrators (two deputy chiefs) and middle managers (four lieutenants) for input to deal with the public and the press, reduce the internal strife, and determine if any procedural or training issues require the department’s attention. He further asks his six supervisors to provide input concerning means of reducing or ending the high level of hostility among patrol officers.
Questions for Discussion
1.
Should Sgt. Lyle shoulder any responsibility for the suspect situation and its aftermath (dissension within the department)? What kinds of inquiries might you make to determine whether or not this is the case?
2.
Given that this seems to have become an agency-wide stress problem, what might the deputy chiefs, lieutenants, and sergeants recommend to the chief?
3.
Should the ROP team be disbanded or continued under different supervision, training, and methods of operation
(Peak 210-211)
The citation provided is a guideline. Please check each citation for accuracy before use.
Chapter 9
CASE STUDIES
The following three case studies demonstrate some of the ethical dilemmas in which supervisors and managers may find themselves.
Case Study #1 Company’s Comin’
You and your partner, a senior deputy, are dispatched on a “found property” call. When you contact the reporting persons, they tell you they have found what appears to be stolen property in the field behind their fence. You find the following: a high-powered microscope, an HD television set, and a DVD player; obviously the burglar got scared away and left the items in the field. You inventory the property and give a receipt to the reporting party, who states they wish to claim the property if, after 30 days, the rightful owner is not found. When you return to the patrol car, your partner tells you he is expecting a “hoard” of people at his home this weekend for the Super Bowl, and that he could really use the television set to “take the load off” their living room. He adds that he is going to “borrow” it for a few days, take it home for the Super Bowl, and then return it on Monday to the property room.
Questions for Discussion

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What are your observations of each officer’s performance?

Following are two case studies that enable the reader to consider some of the substantive issues involved with appraising officer performance and to consider some possible solutions.
Case Study #1 Knowing Your People, or Searching for Hidden Meanings
You are a supervisor in Bay City, recently transferred from the robbery/homicide section of detectives to day shift patrol. You begin your new assignment by reviewing crime reports and calls for service data for the area and meeting with each of your officers to discuss their view of the area’s problems and their work productivity. The south area of the district is divided geographically into five beats, consisting of single-family homes, small commercial businesses, and several large apartment complexes. Approximately 50,000 citizens live in the area; most are middle-class white and Hispanic people who reside and work in the area. Crime analysis data reveals that the most prevalent crime problems are daytime burglaries and thefts of property from the apartment complexes, juvenile drinking, and vandalism. The vandalism is not gang related and is mostly spray paint tagging of schools and businesses. There are three main thoroughfares through the area, but traffic accidents are low in comparison with the rest of the city. After reviewing three of your officers’ past performance evaluations, you determine that Officer Stengel leads the patrol division in felony arrests. Her follow-up investigations have led to the identification of two groups of daytime burglars who were truants from the local school. A review of other performance areas shows similar good effort. Officer Robbins has just completed his probationary period. Troubled by the vandalism, he began working with the city attorney and local business owners on an ordinance that would ban the sale of spray paint to juveniles. Robbins makes every effort to work on this project between calls for service, but some of his fellow officers have complained about having to handle some of his calls. Officer Franklin has 10 years’ experience and would like to work a motorcycle traffic assignment. Selections will be made in six months. In an effort to demonstrate his interest in that assignment, Franklin currently leads the department in the number of citations written. He also leads the department in citizen complaints of rude behavior, but only 2 of 10 complaints in the past three months were sustained. Assume that you are about to engage in an annual performance appraisal for each officer.
Questions for Discussion
1.
What are your observations of each officer’s performance?
2.
Do you have any concerns about any of the behaviors demonstrated by any of the officers?
3.
Do the officers satisfactorily address the district’s problems?
4.
Are there any other issues that may require your attention? If so, how would you handle those issues?

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When you have no idea what to do with your written assignments, use a reliable paper writing service. Now you don’t need to worry about the deadlines, grades, or absence of ideas. Place an order on our site to get original papers for a low price.

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